Thursday, December 30, 2010

Jeffrey

Like the name Alison, Jeffrey (or rather, its older spelling, Geoffrey) was more popular in the Middle Ages, and was borne by such popular luminaries as Geoffrey Plantagenet (Count of Anjou and ancestor of English royalty), Geoffrey (or Godefroy) de Bouillon (leader of the First Crusade), Geoffrey (Gaufridus) of Monmouth (Welsh chronicler), and of course Geoffrey Chaucer. But unlike Alison, its origins are rather obscure. It first appears as a name among the French around 1000 AD, and there are at least four reasonable sources or meanings:

  • Gaiwa-frey, "the peaceful country"

  • Walah-frey, "the peaceful stranger"

  • Gisil-frey, "the pledge of peace"

  • God-frey, "the peace of God"


Any resemblance of these ancient names to "Gallifrey", the ancestral home of the Time Lords, is coincidental. Surely.

It may be that all these names existed independently, and were sort of merged together in people's minds. The only certain thing is the suffix -frey, which meant "peace," "joy," and "beloved," and is related to free, friend, and Frederick.

Spiritually, Jeffrey begins with an edge, a judgement, which gives rise to connection, relationship, and travel. This is then released into freedom, motion, and joy.

1 comment:

  1. "Any resemblance of these ancient names to 'Gallifrey', the ancestral home of the Time Lords, is coincidental. Surely."

    Ha! :)

    I love you.

    ReplyDelete